It is turning out that the two suspected Al-Qaeda terrorists from Yemen, who were deported to Ghana from the United States Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay on the orders of former President Barack Obama, have agreed to leave the country.

They reportedly reached an agreement with the government of Ghana to send them to a third unnamed country.

Charles Owiredu, Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, who made the disclosure on Joy FM, said the two supposed Al-Qaeda terrorists – Mahmud Umar Muhammad Bin Atef and Khalid Muhammad Salih Al-Dhuby – had informed the Akufo-Addo administration to send them to a different country, and added that the negotiations regarding their preferred country had been ongoing.

“So of course, we sought their consent before these negotiations were done,” the deputy minister said.

“Per the laws, the 1951 Convention and 1957 Protocol on Refugees, you would need their consent.

“And so now, you have their consent and they say when you find a country we are ready to leave….. Not as easy as you put. They are aware that government is in negotiation with a third country for them to exit.”

Minority attacks

Last week, the agreement between the erstwhile Mahama’s National Democratic Congress (NDC) government and the Obama administration to repatriate the terror suspects to Ghana resurfaced when the two-year deal expired.

The opposition NDC, which caused the mess whilst in government, had turned around to put pressure on the NPP administration to decide the fate of the two detainees.

In the ensuing heat, it emerged that the Mahama administration attempted to change the names of the suspected terrorists and ended up issuing them with Ghanaian passports, which DAILY GUIDE sources say will expire in August 2018.

They were also given wives, allowing them to integrate into the Ghanaian society.

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